Los Angeles Valley College

Handouts

VERBS WITH -ED ENDINGS

Most students know that regular verbs in English form the past tense by adding -ed.  Remember, a verb tells about an action in a sentence. People usually pronounce the –ed when they speak, but sometimes, if a person speaks fast or softly, the –ed gets lost: “I helped him” and “I help him” may sound the same.  In proofreading your papers, take special care to put in the past-tense indicators.  Irregular verbs may give you less trouble in the past because their forms are different and obvious (are to were, do to did, etc.). But, you may not see that you have forgotten the –ed endings.  Do not be overwhelmed!  There are many ways to train yourself to recognize when and where –ed endings should be used.  Proofreading very carefully aloud will help you remember to put in –ed endings.

 

Graphics: illustration of a face with the mouth as repeated -eds for teeth for past tense

 

                                                                                             Simple                 With –ed Ending                                         

Walk

Walked

Marry

Married

Show

Showed

           

Some adjectives that come from verbs also need –ed endings that students often forget to add.  Notice the correct spellings: A handicapped person appreciates ramps instead of stairs.  I am prejudiced against any salad with pasta in it.

Practice Chart: Spelling and –ed Endings

 

END OF VERB

DOUBLE THE CONSONANT?

SIMPLE FORM

-ED

-e

No

Exist

Existed

Two Consonants

No

Grant

Granted

Two Vowels + One Consonant

No

Shout

Shouted

 

One Vowel + One Consonant

One-Syllable Verbs

Yes

Pat

Patted

Two-Syllable Verbs (Stress on FIRST syllable)

No

Visit

Visited

Two-Syllable Verbs (Stress on SECOND Syllable)

Yes

Admit

Admitted

-y

No

Pry

Pried

-ie

No

Tie

Tied

 

illustration graphic for exercise: a pen & paperExercise:        


Underline the incorrect verb or adjective form in the following sentences and write the correct form above it.            
  1. I use to think she was very different.
  2. Ellen wash her mother’s clothes yesterday.
  3. The next morning Crystal awoke at sunrise and look out at the lake.
  4. For three days Joe and Cheryl fill sacks with dirt and laid these in the flood path.
  5. Eric took the box, open it, and found a Mexican jumping bean.
  6. Please, I am a marry woman!
  7. The mean customer slap Sheldon’s hand.
  8. Melissa is suppose to work today.
  9. Brian made a detail schedule for the day and followed it.
  10. Yesterday, Jen and Adam wandered for several miles along the shore and pick up shells.
  11. I have never believe in superstitions.
  12. Jose smell very bad yesterday.
  13. Stacy was excuse from class by her professor.
  14. Stephanie ask Lou for his advice.
  15. Jocelyn’s classes were dismiss early during the heat wave.


This handout was based on the following text:

Fawcett, Susan and Sandberg, Alvin.  Evergreen with Readings.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company,1992.
For further information in this subject see:
Hacker, Diana,  A Writer’s Reference.  4th ed.  New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 1999.
Matthies, Barbara F. and Betty Schrampfer Azar. Fundamentals of English Grammar.  2nd ed.  New Jersey: Prentice-Hall,        1995.  24-25.


All of the above texts are available in The Writing Center.

Rev.06/13/06


 

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