The Green Dining Standards

Did you know that on Average Americans use 2,200 paper napkins per year? That’s about six per day.  If everyone cut their daily napkin use by just one, this would keep up to one billion pounds of trash out of landfills every year {source: 50waystohelp.com}. 
See the links below for tips and useful websites.

Sustainable Dining and Eating
Reduce
Reusables
Recycle and Compost
Food Waste

Sustainable Dining and Eating
Sustainable agriculture is a way of raising food that is healthy for consumers and animals, does not harm the environment, is humane for workers, respects animals, provides a fair wage to the farmer, and supports and enhances rural communities.

Reduce

  • Take only the napkins, condiments and other disposable items that you will actually us.
  • Bring your own utensils from home.  Carry them in your car or purse. Take home wash and reuse.
  • Bring your own lunch to work use cloth napkins, canvas lunch bags, containers, etc. that can be washed and reused.

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Reusables

  • Encourage places that you get take out food from, such as the Campus Cafeteria, to use a new line of vegetable-based, 100 percent biodegradable food ware.  (The Green Restaurant Association presents the first public Guide of GRA-Endorsed Products. Since 1990, the GRA has been facilitating the restaurant industry to achieve environmental sustainability. Showcased here are a selection of some of the best environmental solutions the industry has to offer; http://www.dinegreen.com/solutions.asp
  • When doing catering, ask caterer to use biodegradable food ware or use products made from leaves and bamboo.   See this link for items that are compostable and biodegradable for picnics, catering, use at home, or for catering: http://dgs.greenhome.com/products/institutional_sales/food_service/.

Recycle and Compost

  • If you eat out or attend an event where there are items that can be recycled. Sort your waste and put into appropriate containers.                                                                                                    
  • Encourage, the composting of items from events that are catered, or encourage the Campus Cafeteria to set-up recycling bins and to do composting.             

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Food Waste
FOOD WASTE INCLUDES uneaten portions of meals and trimmings from food preparation activities in kitchens, restaurants and cafeterias. Food waste is the third-largest component of generated waste by weight. However, because of its low composting rate, food waste is the largest component of discarded waste by weight. According to a study by the University of Arizona Garbage Project, Americans throw away 1.3 pounds of food every day, or 474.5 pounds per year. (See copy of article used for information in this link: http://wasteage.com/mag/waste_food_waste_2/)

  • Shop more frequently for fresh vegetable, fruit, and dairy products as The USDA estimates that higher percentages of fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy and grain products are thrown away. A lower percentages of meat, dried beans, nuts and processed foods are disposed of.
  • Reduce food waste through careful consideration of your servings when choosing or ordering meals and snacks.
  • Bring your own containers to take left over food home.
  • Increased use of packaged foods, as they cause are not thrown away as often, and the consumption of packaged foods was a key factor causing food waste's share of the solid waste stream to decrease by one-sixth in the period from 1960 to 2000.

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