ART GALLERY


 
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Up (Off the Base) poster

Up (Off the Base)

 

Artists Reception
Thursday, October 17, 2013
6 – 8 pm

 

Exhibition is open October 17 - December 12, 2013

 

Monday, 11 am to 5 pm and 6 to 9 pm

Tuesday through Thursday,

11 am to 5 pm

 

Los Angeles Valley College Art Gallery is pleased to present Up (Off the Base), a group exhibition that explores hanging sculptures by artists Carol Bishop, Rebekah Bogard, Jamison Carter, Olga Koumoundouros, Jason Kunke, John Pearson, Katie Queen, Jaime Scholnick, and Joe Suzuki. Up opens October 17 and closes December 12, 2013. The gallery will host a reception for the artists on Thursday, October 17, from 6 to 8 p.m.

 

American color field painter Barnett Newman once remarked that sculpture is what you bump into when backing up to see a painting. Up (Off the Base) takes that statement as a subversive point of departure and examines sculptural objects that are created not for display on the pedestal or the ground. In Up, nine artists explore color, surface texture, and the intersection of paint and material. In addition, almost all of the pieces embody an additive element of paint in them, further complicating the traditional definitions of sculpture.

 

Carol Bishop’s constructed and painted, wooden sculptures resemble the geometric forms found in Kazimir Malevich’s paintings. Bishop investigates Modernist architectural structures as organic entities and distills delineated forms from them to create abstract pieces that possess a formal presence.

 

Rebekah Bogard’s fantastical and hybridized floral object—laboriously handcrafted, low-fired earthenware—pushes the traditional definitions of femininity through the use of color and curvy lines within her sculptural work; she embraces pink colors and spherical shapes not as conventionally engendered symbols but as empowering re-contextualization of femininity.

 

Jamison Carter’s bizarre sculptures—constructed globs of acrylic paint on commercial grade Tyvek—hang like paintings but exude tactile dimensions, resembling alien-like creatures and orifices that both reveal and repel.

 

Olga Koumoundouros’s ceiling lamps—recycled milk jugs collaged with grocery store circulars—address the fundamental principle of the American Dream, which is home ownership, inviting viewers to consider the ties---emotional, financial, and psychological—that bind us to the place we call home. Her readymade objects serve as stand-in symbols of the political and personal fallout of the recent housing market collapse.

 

Jason Kunke’sGrace Hartigan piece quotes from a statement made by the American Abstract Expressionist painter of that name. This work—a replica of a nonfunctional, neon sign made entirely of steel—metaphorically comments not only on the accessibility of fabrication in the post-industrial condition but also on the denial of what a neon sign promises to deliver.

 

John Pearson’s painted, wooden sculpture/sculptural painting evokes a 1950s cool, a stacking of minimal, oval shapes that resemble a Jetsons’s spacecraft or a streamlined, abstract totem.

 

Katie Queen’s ceramic work—heavily inspired by organic forms—call attention to materiality and craftsmanship, both of which the artist minds and covets, respectively. Utilizing rich pigments and complex designs, Queen sculpts process-oriented objects that originate from her own memory and also invention. The resulting works express both a fragility and sturdiness.

 

Jaime Scholnick—using discarded, unaltered polystyrene packing material as her medium—merges color harmonies with bold lines to produce abstract works that transform “garbage” into refined objects of art. Scholnick’s brightly painted pieces speak volumes about humankind’s throwaway culture.

 

Joe Suzuki—employing common materials such as MDF (medium-density fiberboard), raw canvas, and plastic—creates meticulously crafted sculptures that explore materiality, trompe l’oeil, color and personal history. The artist investigates his mixed cultural background by celebrating its eccentricities, fusing childhood memories with fantasy.


High-resolution images of artworks can be provided upon request.

 

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Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery – parking permit is required during gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

For general Art Gallery information: 818-778-5536


Contact
Sam Lee, Art Gallery Director

Los Angeles Valley College

5800 Fulton Avenue

Valley Glen, CA 91401

 
 
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Student Show 2013 Flyer

Insomniacs (Student Show)

 

Artists Reception
Thursday, May 16, 2013
6 – 8 pm

 


Exhibition is open May 16 – June 3, 2013 & August 26 – September 5, 2013

 

Monday through Thursday,

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

 

Note: Art Gallery will be closed during the summer & Labor Day (September 2, 2013)

 

Insomniacs (Student Show) highlights the tremendous range of artworks created by Los Angeles Valley College students during the 2012-2013 academic year. Juried by the faculty, the selected works are among exemplary pieces produced in courses taught within the art department than span a wide range of disciplines in the visual arts such as drawing, painting, design, illustration, photography, printmaking, three-dimensional design, sculpture and ceramics. Students of diverse backgrounds, both art majors and non-art ones, remarkably demonstrate a variety of approaches to material, methodology, and subject matter, revealing the successful outcome of a comprehensive art program. At the same time, each artwork reflects the very unique and nuanced style of individual student. Whether at the beginning, intermediate or advanced level, the works on display collectively exhibit a thorough exploration of artistic expressions. It is with great pleasure that the LAVC Art Gallery annually hosts this exhibition, honoring the outstanding achievements of its talented students.

 

Insomniacs (Student Show) was organized in collaboration with the LAVC Arts Club.

 

High-resolution images of artworks can be provided upon request.

 

 ---

Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery – parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

For general Art Gallery information: 818-778-5536


Contact
Sam Lee, Art Gallery Director

Los Angeles Valley College

5800 Fulton Avenue

Valley Glen, CA 91401

323-788-3535


 

 
 
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Gegam Kacherian Flyer

Gegam Kacherian
Thirty-Six Year Survey

 

Reception

Thursday, February 21, 2013
6 pm - 9 pm


 

Exhibition is open February 14 through April 11, 2013

 

Monday through Thursday,

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

 

The art gallery will be closed during Spring Break from March 28 to April 5, 2013

 

Gegam Kacherian: Thirty-Six Year Survey is the first retrospective of Armenian artist Gegam Kacherian in the United States. This exhibition charts the trajectory of Kacherian’s art practice, showcasing fifty-five works that range from his earliest tempera pieces on masonite to his recent acrylic paintings on canvas. Each artwork is carefully selected for its characteristics of style, technique and narrative. The show is purposely displayed in a non-chronological order. In most cases, varied artworks are placed next to each other as a way to create unpredictable juxtapositions and to stimulate discussions about his craft and concepts as a whole.

 

From his nascent works to his current ones, Kacherian has always been deeply involved in exploring the dichotomy of the spiritual and the material, the fleeting and the permanent, the metaphysical and the pragmatic. To the artist, this duality is not opposing but exists in harmony. In his early nudes, for example, the figurative element goes beyond the mere portrayal of the human physiognomy; abstract forms are also incorporated to suggest a mystical dimension. Kacherian’s latest acrylic paintings represent an evolution of this thought process; they are an amalgamation of different elements that together make a whole. These pieces oscillate between the non-objective and the representational. They serve as metaphors for the spiritual and the secular, co-existing in an all-encompassing force that cannot be easily defined.

 

Kacherian was born and raised in Yerevan, Armenia, and came to Los Angeles in 1988, where he lives now with his wife, Zara, and two sons, Marat and Miran. Kacherian received a BFA degree in 1981 from Terlmezian Fine Arts College in Yerevan. In 2005, he was selected for a visual arts residency at Idyllwild Arts in San Bernardino, California, while in 2004, Kacherian was awarded a residency at the First Jeju International Art Festival in Jeju, Korea. Kacherian has also served as Artist-in-Residence for four consecutive years in Thailand at the Rajamangala University of Technology at several campuses for their nationwide university system. His works are included in the permanent collections of museums in Armenia, France, Colombia, and Thailand, and his paintings are part of many private collections, including the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation in Los Angeles. Reviews of Kacherian’s recent exhibitions are found in Art in American (December 2009), Los Angeles Times (September 18, 2009), ArtScene (October 2009), Art Ltd. (January 2010), and Artillery (September/October 2010). In October 2013, Kacherian will complete his fourth solo exhibition at Rosamund Felsen Gallery at Bergamot Station in Santa Monica, California.

 

High-resolution images of artworks can be provided upon request.


 ---

Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery – parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

For general Art Gallery information: 818-778-5536


Contact
Sam Lee, Art Gallery Director

Los Angeles Valley College

5800 Fulton Avenue

Valley Glen, CA 91401

323-788-3535


 

 
 
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Poster for Translations

 

T R A N S L A T I O N S

artists of the metro orange line

 

Reception

Thursday, October 11, 2012

6 pm - 9 pm

 

Artist Panel Discussion

Thursday, October 11, 2012

7 pm

Art Building Room 103

 

Exhibition is open October 11 through December 13, 2012

Monday through Thursday,

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

 

Note: Art Gallery will be closed on Veteran's Day (November 12, 2012)  and during the Thanksgiving holiday (November 22-25, 2012)

 

Translations: Artists of the Metro Orange Line features the works of twenty artists commissioned for the Orange Line dedicated busway. Presenting artworks that reflect the artists’ studio practice alongside their Metro commissions is intended to provide insight into the many ways artists translate their methods and materials to create works of art for public transportation sites.

 

An eighteen-mile bus transitway with a total of eighteen stations, the Metro Orange Line connects neighborhoods and activity centers and improves mobility for commuters. The alignment is paralleled by a new landscaped bikeway and pedestrian path, and set within a dramatic mountainous backdrop. As an extensive, networked public space, it also provides significant opportunities for displaying public art that enriches the transit environment and contributes to the artistic vibrancy of the neighborhoods served by Metro.

 

Lead artist, Renée Petropoulos, imagined the line as a ribbon that fluidly weaves through the San Fernando Valley. Within this overall framework, the artwork opportunities at each station are uniformly positioned, with a different artist featured in each station area to maximize impact for customers. In this way, each artist’s unique vision provides a distinct aesthetic experience from neighborhood to neighborhood.   Similarly, landscape artist Jud Fine developed design concepts for landscaping artwork and plantings integrated throughout the bus transitway alignment.

 

The artwork at each station represents the culmination of a process of translation—both in concept, practice and material. Each station artist first created an artwork in their material of choice, including drawing, painting, collage and photography. Their final designs were then translated by highly trained artisans to the durable materials of porcelain enamel steel, rustic terrazzo and glass and stone mosaic that are necessary to withstand outdoor transit environments, and to ensure long-term artistic integrity.

 

Translations: Artists of the Metro Orange Line physically reveals a critical and often challenging process for the artist in negotiating the changes that occur when an artwork is fabricated for a public site. The exhibition juxtaposes artists’ designs for Metro stations with artworks from their studio practice, prompting viewers to compare the differences and similarities in process, artistic intent and subject matter between these distinct bodies of work.

 

Established in 1989, the Metro Art program has commissioned over 300 artists for a wide variety of temporary and permanent projects. Artists are selected through a peer review process with community input. All works are created specifically for their transit-related sites. Metro’s public art policy allocates one half of one percent of project construction costs for art.

 

As Metro better connects the region with its rapidly growing transit system, it contributes to the visual landscape of communities, enriches the public space of transit stations and creates new opportunities for artists.

 

Phung Huynh

Assistant Professor of Art

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Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery – no parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

For general Art Gallery information: 818-778-5536


 

 
 
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Poster for Student Show 2012

S t u d e n t S h o w 2 0 1 2

 

Reception

Thursday, May 17, 2012

6 pm - 8 pm

 

Exhibition is open May 17 through May 31, 2012

and August 27 through  September 6, 2012

Monday through Thursday,

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

 

Note: Art Gallery will be closed during the Summer & Labor Day (September 4, 2012)

 

The current exhibition, Student Show 2012, highlights the tremendous breadth of artworks created by Los Angeles Valley College students during the 2011 – 2012 academic year. The selected works are among exemplary pieces produced in courses taught within the art department that span a wide range of disciplines in the visual arts such as drawing, painting, design, illustration, photography, printmaking, three-dimensional design, sculpture and ceramics. Students of diverse backgrounds, both art majors and non-art majors, remarkably demonstrate a variety of approaches to material, methodology and subject matter that reveal the successful outcome of a comprehensive art program. At the same time, each artwork reflects the very unique and nuanced style of the individual student. Whether at the beginning, intermediate or advanced level, the works on display collectively exhibit a thorough exploration of artistic expression from naturalism, to collage, abstraction, graphic sensibilities, painterly techniques, and refined constructions. It is with great pleasure that the LAVC Art Gallery annually hosts an exhibition that honors the outstanding achievements of our talented students and faculty.

 

Phung Huynh

Assistant Professor of Art

 ---

Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery – no parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

For general Art Gallery information: 818-778-5536


 

 
 
 
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Poster for Obscured Lines

O b s c u r e d L i n e s

Contemporary Drawing
in Los Angeles

 

Reception

Thursday, March 1, 2012

6 pm

Conversation with the artists at

7 pm

 

Exhibition is open March 1 through

April 19, 2012

Monday through Thursday,

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

 

Drawing is a natural and immediate form of human expression, driven by the impulse to doodle, write, or sketch. In contemporary art practices, drawing is more of a metaphoric and sometimes hyperbolic connection between looking and thinking. This approach allows artists to question the real, tangible world and to communicate ideas and experiences in more inventive ways. Artists are afforded the versatility of drawing as an art form that can be an accurate description of real life experience or a transcription of memory; it can be social critique or playful meandering of line; it can be representational, abstract, gestural or expressionistic.

 

The exhibition seeks to locate contemporary drawing in Los Angeles and features the works of nine artists. Some of the artists are native Angelenos, and some are émigré Angelenos, shaping an eclectic yet informed perspective on drawing practices today. The works on display blur the symbolic line that attempts to rigidly define drawing. Looking beyond traditional "works on paper," these artists demonstrate the process of drawing as experimentation and exploration in a context that is directly or loosely connected to metropolitan culture in Southern California.

 

One of the byproducts of urbanization and inhabiting such a large, sprawling city as Los Angeles is the attempt to understand the human condition. In Joe Biel's delicate renderings of "charged human situations," Biel portrays the human condition as enigmatic, bizarre and contradictory. Fragments of figural stone sculptures appear fleshy, or an open picture book with real objects tumble from its leaves, are all drawn scenarios that reference the contradictions of human experience. In Sergio Teran's life-size charcoal drawings, he examines the human condition through portraiture, unveiling individual people. Teran is known for his portraits of people close to him who mime a symbolic activity or gesture. Some of these portraits include figures wearing Mexican wrestling masks. The mask can give the person superhuman strength and the guise to be a spiritual being. Yet without the mask, the person is left ordinary. Like Biel and Teran, Alexandra Wiesenfeld's work is representational and figurative with subject matter that is not literal, but is psychologically probing. Her mixed media drawings are layers of images which include people, animals and foliage that occupy a mysterious azure landscape. Wiesenfeld's drawing process echoes how she thinks our minds work in complex layers of thoughts, feelings and projections.

 

Another significant theme that occurs in the drawing exhibition is the tenuous relationship between people and nature. In Jennifer Celio's work, she engages the viewer with hyper detailed graphite drawings of dense forests with dappling light interspersed between branches and leaves. Upon closer observation, the drawings reveal cellphone towers disguised as trees and an airplane flying overhead. Celio addresses environmental degradation that is directly linked to human occupation and urban sprawl that is prevalent in Los Angeles. A similar concern poetically emerges in Elizabeth Saveri's pieces. Her subject matter is often of trees, leaves, and trash, objects she describes as "features in [her] urban environment that are everywhere, but rarely seen or noticed." The remnants of nature (dead leaves) and the residue of human activity (trash) are intermingled in the same space. Saveri's drawings operate as an allegorical reminder that the passage of time and decay do not distinguish between what is natural or what is manmade. Although Kiel Johnson's works do not incorporate images of nature, the absence of nature underscores the machine-like elements of his drawings. Johnson's art reflects an interest in the investigation of how things are built and work. He takes apart everyday, utilitarian objects such as shopping carts and bleachers and reconstructs them into visually fascinating forms void function. Johnson creates compact cityscapes that are filled with industrial structures, but where no living creature can inhabit. Thick layers of roads and buildings overlap to create an irregularly shaped globe, too busy for anyone to live on. The irony of man-made objects that become useless is punctuated by his black and white compositions drawn on a raw wooden surface.

 

The featured artists in the exhibition push the boundaries of drawing beyond traditional flat works. Some specifically choose to experiment with abstraction, installation, and more conceptual practices, which challenge the conventional picturesque ideas about drawing. In Margaret Griffith's large-scale works, she skillfully handles pigmented ink on paper to divide space into dissecting planes and geometric forms. The forms collectively warp and twist, suggesting the interior or exterior of architectural structures. These structures are not specific buildings or places but collapse back into a more intuitive, abstract visual experience. Griffith's more recent projects are paper installations inspired by domestic gates in her neighborhood. She replicates these gates by cutting out their negatives spaces on heavyweight white paper and allows the "paper gates" to pile on top of each other, which ultimately transform into an abstract sculpture. Tim Nolan is an artist who also questions how drawing is traditionally made and perceived. Nolan's "drawings" are mylar tape strategically affixed to walls. His process is challenging through his choice of abstract imagery and his decision to make drawings as installations. His work comes across as precise geometric patterns, but there is a gradual understanding that his wall pieces shift the perception of two-dimensional and three-dimensional space. The illusionary space and planes created by the tape juxtapose the true plane that is the wall itself, keeping in flux what is real and what is drawn.

 

A critical aspect of contemporary drawing is to fully explore its potential conceptually. Interested in investigating the ideas that motivate art-making, Hataya Tubtim's work addresses art as an experience rather than an object. Tubtim is aware of the viewer's role in the interpretation of the art, and her audience's gestures become part of her piece. Tubtim's work in the exhibition is meant to operate as a line "mural drawing," and the viewers are given vinyl stickers to place on the drawing. A mural is typically meant to be public and commands participation of an audience. For Tubtim, drawing is about mark-making, but the marks are made by both artist and viewer. In contemplating her methods, Tubtim articulates that: "In participatory practice, compromise is vital when relying on the audience or other artists for the full realization of an image. Compromise is not construed as failure, but the reality of a social moment." For many artists, that "social moment" is essential, the exchange between the artwork, vis-à-vis the artist, and the viewer which ultimately brings life to the art object. The exhibition is a modest survey of the exciting trends that are occurring in contemporary drawing. For the artist, it is not simply about making marks or empty gestures. Drawing is core to the physical manifestation of an idea, feeling or experience.

 

Phung Huynh

Assistant Professor of Art

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Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery – no parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

For general Art Gallery information: 818-778-5536


 


 

 

 

 
 
 
 
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Poster for Dane Picard Selected Works

Dane Picard

Selected Works

 

Reception

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

6-9 pm

 

Exhibition is open November 9 through

December 15, 2011

Monday through Thursday,

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

 

The current exhibition of thirty-seven selected works by Dane Picard focuses on the last ten years of the artist's unique process in digital media. Picard has been working with digital media since the 1980s, experimenting with early computer and animation software. His studies in philosophy and electrical engineering also inform his practice, in which he produces artwork that is more than slick digital imaging or moving trompe l'oeil. Rather, Picard's nuanced understanding of how the computer and technology impact contemporary cultural habits and attitudes is connected to his interest in how people receive, process, and filter constant visual information. He assembles a rich database of imagery that he finds or creates and poetically manipulates what would have been perceived as random visual data. The engagement in Picard's work becomes an experience of looking at familiar pictures in quick pulses that transform into an unusual optical sensation.

 

In Picard's portrait series of famous dead artists, he gathers and combines digital reproductions of self-portraits made by renowned painters such as Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, Frida Kahlo, and Vincent van Gogh. The opportunity to view these self-portraits in person pales in comparison to the masses who have more access to the masterpieces through reproduction in photographs, textbooks, and the Internet. Picard, therefore, appropriates the reproduction of the famous self-portrait, an image that is essentially part of the larger database of popular visual culture, and confronts the viewer with a re(de)generation of the original. He creates a sequence in which the earliest self-portrait of the famous artist morphs into a later self-portrait, and the sequence is then repeated. The viewer witnesses a transformation of the iconic image aging, almost disintegrating, and then returning to youth again. The gaze of the famous artist expands and contracts in a painterly language unique to that artist. A rhythm in set into motion where deconstructing and reconstructing a famous portrait are synthesized.

 

Though Picard's primary medium is digital media, there is a strong physical presence in his works. The hardware, wires, lights, screens, tape, monitors, and projectors are carefully considered as parts of a sculpture or installation. Picard's work is a constant reminder that the virtual world exists in the physical world, and simulating a visual experience is ultimately derived from a physically tangible one. This almost paradoxical relationship between simulation and reality, digital media and sculpture, is beautifully addressed in his piece, Water to Wine. The piece is viewed through a Plexiglas layer that sits in front of four small screens taken from disposable digital video cameras. The screens are arranged vertically. The top screen displays the neck of a slightly tipped bottle as water pours from its opening. The three screens below show the clear water gradually transforming into wine and is finally collected in a delicate glass goblet at the very bottom screen. The seamless shift of water to wine is magical, and even when the viewer is lost in its miracle, Picard reminds us of the simulated transformation. The work itself is a physical arrangement of screens, wires, and hardware affixed to a wall. And, when the piece is unplugged, no miracle can be witnessed.

 

Dane Picard's projects incorporate elements of digital media and current technology in beautiful and poetic ways. His body of work places him at the forefront of contemporary new media art. Picard's projects also play a significant role in cultural and social critiques related to technology and the dissemination of information. Particularly with the advent of the computer and viewing the world through a digital lens, a once broader global society is quickly shrinking as our understanding of what is real and what is simulated is also diminishing. Picard's work is sophisticated yet accessible, tapping into the ways in which a viewer from a visually rich, internet-crazed, global society processes information.

 

Dane Picard studied English, Philosophy and Electrical Engineering at the University of Utah. He earned his undergraduate degree in Fine Art at Cornish College of Arts and received his graduate degree in Experimental Animation at CalArts. His works have been exhibited nationally with extensive publication. Dane Picard has shown at renowned spaces such as Richard Heller Gallery in Santa Monica, Post Gallery in Los Angeles, Austin Museum of Art, Torrance Art Museum, and Pasadena Museum of Art. He has received the Art Here and Now Program award from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Picard's work has been reviewed in publications such as the Los Angeles Times, ArtWeek, The Magazine, and San Diego Union Tribune.

 

 

Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery – no parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

For general Art Gallery information: 818-778-5536


 
 
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Poster for A Fine Day's Work

Download Poster (PDF)

Student Show 2011 

 

Reception

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

6-8 pm

 

Exhibition is open May 25 through June 2, 2011
and August 29 – September 8, 2011

Monday through Thursday,

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

 

The current exhibition, Student Show 2011, highlights the tremendous breadth of artworks created by Los Angeles Valley College students during the 2010 – 2011 academic year. The selected works are among exemplary pieces produced in courses taught within the art department that span a wide range of disciplines in the visual arts such as drawing, painting, design, illustration, photography, printmaking, three-dimensional design, sculpture and ceramics. Students of diverse backgrounds, both art majors and non-art majors, remarkably demonstrate a variety of approaches to material, methodology and subject matter that reveal the successful outcome of a comprehensive art program. At the same time, each artwork reflects the very unique and nuanced style of the individual student. Whether at the beginning, intermediate or advanced level, the works on display collectively exhibit a thorough exploration of artistic expression from naturalism, to collage, abstraction, graphic sensibilities, painterly techniques, and refined constructions. It is with great pleasure that the LAVC Art Gallery annually hosts an exhibition that honors the outstanding achievements of our talented students and faculty.

 

Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery – no parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

For general Art Gallery information: 818-778-5536


 
 
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Image of 'In the Circle'
Ruth Bernhard
In the Circle, 1934
Gelatin Silver Print
Image of 'Untitled (Man in Baby Carriage)'
Helen Levitt
Untitled (Man in Baby Carriage), 1938
Gelatin Silver Print
Image of 'Untitled (Desk Metamorphosis – Ellis Island Desk)'
Jerry Uelsmann
Untitled (Desk Metamorphosis – Ellis Island Desk), 1988
Gelatin Silver Print
 
Poster for A Fine Day's Work

Download Poster (PDF)

A Fine Day’s Work: Photographs from the Michael R. Whalen Collection 

 

Reception

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

7 pm

 

Discussion with the collector, Michael R. Whalen, regarding his collection, and with dealer, collector & author Stephen White on the commoditization of photographs as a collectable

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

8 pm

 

Exhibition is open April 5 through May 12, 2011

Monday through Thursday,

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

(Closed from April 18 through April 25, 2011 for Spring Break)

 

This exhibition consists of over 100 vintage photographs created between 1895 and 1988 by eighteen renowned photographers. All of the prints are drawn from a single private collection. Included are works by Richard Avedon, Ruth Bernhard, Ilse Bing, Margaret Bourke-White, Josef Breitenbach, Ralston Crawford, Imogen Cunningham, Harold Edgerton, Helen Levitt, Ralph Meatyard, Hansel Mieth, Lisette Model, Alexander Rodchenko, Aaron Siskind, Karl Struss, Jerry Uelsmann, Adam Clark Vroman and Weegee.

 

This collection is unusual in that the collector, Michael R. Whalen, does not collect a single work by each artist, but rather, if possible, all of the photographs taken during a single photographic session. Not only does this approach offer unique challenges, such as determining how many photographs were made during a session and locating them, but it has unique rewards as well. Once the works are reassembled, the group of photographs offers the possibility to view the photographer’s progress during the session, and even to speculate why he or she may have taken a particular shot in a particular order.

 

A Fine Day’s Work is the third exhibition in an ongoing series that the Art Gallery has presented over the last several years on the subject of collectors and their collections.

 

Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery – no parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

The exhibition has been curated by Dennis Reed.

 

Quotes from the Guest Book

This show left me breathless. Powerful in your understanding of each artist, which is an amazing feat!
  Marilyn Sanders

 

Thank you so much for sharing your passion with us!!
  Lloyd Hamrol

 

A wonderful show. Splendid indeed. I had to come back for more.
  Tina Freeman

 

Thank you so much for the opportunity to see these treasures.
  Scott and Nancy Tomasheski

 
 
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Collage of Faculty Makes imagesDetails of artwork
Rainbow House by Joe Bavaro Rainbow House by Joe Bavaro
 
Poster for Faculty Makes Art Gallery Event

Download Poster (PDF)

Faculty Makes: Recent Works by LAVC Faculty 

 

Artists Reception and Talk

Tuesday, February 15, 2011, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm, with a special musical performance by LAVC Music Faculty

 

Exhibit is open February 15 through March 10, 2011

Monday through Thursday

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

(Closed on President’s Day and Cesar Chavez Day) 

 

Los Angeles Valley College is a two-year public college founded in 1949. The picturesque campus is located in the suburb of Valley Glen, nearby Hollywood, downtown Los Angeles, and major motion picture and television studios. A student-focused, multicultural campus, the college’s Art Department provides a very diverse and rigorous program in the visual arts. Professors integrate their own professional practices into their pedagogy, offering courses of the highest caliber in drawing, painting, design, illustration, printmaking, sculpture, three-dimensional design, and ceramics.

 

The current exhibition, Faculty Makes: Recent Works by LAVC Faculty features the rich variety of artworks by ten visual arts professors who give a personal insight on how an artist’s unique approach and process can significantly inform the way that one teaches. Making art is critically tied with teaching art. A fascinating look at such an eclectic group with wide-ranging styles and methods, the exhibition reveals artistic growth, formation of ideas, and creative expression and inquiry from the artist-teacher.

 

Participating professors include Carol Bishop, Joe Bavaro, Annie Buckley, Jamison Carter, Dale Fulkerson, Sam Goffredo, Phung Huynh, Tom Mossman, Dennis Reed, and Vance Studley.

 

Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B or C) north of the Art Gallery- no parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

Contact

Phung Huynh, Gallery Manager,
or Dennis Reed, Dean of Arts
Los Angeles Valley College
5800 Fulton Ave
Valley Glen, CA 91401
818-947-2625

 

 

Quotes from the Guest Book

How truly wonderful to see a glimpse of the work of our professors. The scope of their craft, talent, history and reach is at once enviable and empowering…
  Jaclyn Bernstein

 

Incredible show – maybe one of the best experiences for me at this gallery…
  Nareh Sargsyan

 

What a wonderful show! Beautifully hung! I’m so proud to know you’re here – music was grand, too!
  La Vergne Rosow

 
 
Click on a thumbnail to see the full picture.
Untitled Looped Wire Sculpture Ruth Asawa
Untitled Looped Wire Sculpture (detail) 1954
Private Collection
Bridge of the Saracens Ynez Johnston
Bridge of the Saracens, 1953
Woodblock print
Collection of the artist
Bridge of the Saracens Betye Saar
The Occidental Tourist, 1989
Mixed media assemblage
Collection of the artist
 
Entry of the Cultural Windows Exhibit 
 
A display in the Cultural Windows Exhibit 
 
A Sculpture in the Cultural Windows Exhibit 
 
Poster for Cultural Windows Art Gallery Event

Download Poster (PDF)

Cultural Windows: The Art of Ruth Asawa, Ynez Johnston and Betye Saar 

 

Reception

Tuesday, November 2, 2010

7 pm

 

Lecture by Karin Higa, Adjunct Senior Curator of Art at
the Japanese American National Museum

Tuesday, November 2, 2010

8 pm

 

Exhibition is open November 3 through December 16, 2010

Monday through Thursday,

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

(Closed for Veteran’s Day and Thanksgiving)

 

Women of the same generation, Ruth Asawa, Ynez Johnston, and Betye Saar are notable California artists who have produced significant bodies of work. As if looking through a window, which can provide views in both directions, these artists have been inspired by peering outwardly at various cultures, foreign or domestic, while looking inwardly to reinterpret their personal feelings, heritage or ancestry. Through their provocative experimentation with cultural representation, Asawa, Johnston and Saar have developed their own personal visions, often lyrical and poignant.

 

The exhibition of approximately fifty works includes sculpture, paintings, drawings, prints and ceramics.

 

Ruth Asawa (born 1926) graduated from high school at the Rohwer Internment Camp in Arkansas and later worked as a domestic servant while attending college in Wisconsin to train as an art teacher. After being told by college administrators that she would not be hired as a teacher because of anti-Japanese sentiment, she decided to attend Black Mountain College, where she studied color theory and painting. Asawa is best known for her large, biomorphic sculptures made of looped wire, as well as her drawings and prints. Her carefully crafted sculptures, which can appear both solid and transparent, cast ethereal shadows. She developed this technique after a visit to Mexico in 1947, where she saw local artisans creating woven wire baskets. Her work references the long tradition of handcraft in Japanese culture, where crafts are highly celebrated.

 

Ynez Johnston (born 1920) graduated from UC Berkeley in 1946. While studying there, she became enthralled with Asian and Persian art that she saw in area museums. An interest in the art of distant lands encouraged her to travel to Japan, Southeast Asia, India, Mexico and Europe, where she absorbed the distinctive drawing styles and symbols of indigenous cultures. She artfully combines these cultural influences to produce her whimsical combinations of mythical creatures in fanciful environments that feel both exotic and highly personal. Over her long career, she has produced prints, paintings, drawings, sculpture, and ceramics.

 

Betye Saar (born 1926) graduated from UCLA (BA) and studied further at three area universities before seeing an exhibition of Joseph Cornell in 1968 that encouraged her to explore assemblage. Her work often incorporates found objects, many of which she finds at area swap meets. Saar’s art addresses cultural issues related to mysticism, ancestry, and history as well as social issues related to racism, stereotypes, and oppression. In one well-known work, “The Liberation of Aunt Jemima,” she incorporates images of the “mammy” to challenge degrading tropes regarding African American women. Saar’s work can sometimes confront the viewer directly, but it can also gently beguile the viewer with an evocative sense of memory, often stimulated by her use of old photographs, dried flowers, and personal articles. Among her many recognitions are two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships.

 

 

Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive (between Fulton and Ethel). Please park in one of the lots (B, C or D) north or east of the Art Gallery – no parking permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

All events are free to the public.

 

A modest catalogue will be published.

 

The exhibition has been co-curated by Dennis Reed and Phung Huyng.

 

For general Art Gallery information: 818-778-5536

 

Contact

Phung Huynh, Gallery Manager,
or Dennis Reed, Dean of Arts
Los Angeles Valley College
5800 Fulton Ave
Valley Glen, CA 91401
818-947-2625

 

 

Quotes from the Guest Book

Best show I’ve seen in a long time. Absolutely staggering work!
  Kent Twitchell

 

Thank you for 3 inspiring women artists who are still dong it. You go girls!
  Melinda Warren

 

Interesting variety of images.
  Nancy Pearlman, Board of Trustees


 

 

 
VIMEO logo
Watch a brief but fun video of the Art Gallery reception, No Laughing Matter on VIMEO
 
Click on a thumbnail to see the full picture.
 Walter Gabrielson
Party Will Change My Life, 1991
Oil on canvas mounted to board
Collection of Los Angeles Valley College
 
 Ilene Segalove
Pinkie, 1979
Photograph
Courtesy of Jancar Gallery, Los Angeles
 
 Masami Teraoka
McDonald’s Hamburgers in Japan / Tokyo Ginza Shuffle, 1982
15 color silkscreen print
Collection of Jeri Coates
Flyer of No Laughing Matter

No Laughing Matter: Art and Humor in Southern California (a modest sampling) 

 

Artist’s Reception & Program

Wednesday, 7 pm

February 24, 2010

 

Open February 25 through April 15, 2010

Monday through Thursday,

 

11 am to 2 pm and 6 pm to 9 pm

Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm

(Closed for Spring Break, March 29 – April 5, 2010)

 

An artistic pun can be very amusing, as can art based upon clever wit, farcical satire, or fanciful whimsy. This show is a sampling of works that use such potentially droll approaches, from artists who make humor the central theme of their work, to those who only occasionally decide to tickle our funny bone.

 

There was the time, in the 1970s, when artist Jeffrey Vallance buried a frozen chicken in a pet cemetery. In the 1960s, Richard Pettibone pulled off one of the great art stunts by making miniature copies of famous works in prominent LA collections, then selling the works to the same collectors. Today Stephen Berkman produces new photographs using antiquated processes to tease our sense of history, such as his image of a 19th century woman knitting a condom. And who does not know about William Wegman’s dog, Man Ray? These are a few of the artists and artworks in No Laughing Matter. Please don’t dismiss this art as lightweight fluff unworthy of sober consideration. This art is seriously funny.

 

Sixteen artists, some emerging, some veterans, are represented in the exhibition: Michael Arata, Walter Askin, Merwin Belin, Stephen Berkman, Jim Eller, Walter Gabrielson, Doug Harvey, Richard Pettibone, Pierre Picot, Erika Rothenberg, Ilene Segalove, Mahara Sinclaire, Dave Smith, Masami Teraoka, Jeffrey Vallance, and William Wegman.

 

Enter the campus at Oxnard Street and Campus Drive. Please park in one of the lots (C, D or E) north or east of the Art Gallery – no permit is required during Gallery hours. The Art Gallery is located in the Art Building.

 

Quotes from the Guest Book

What a hoot!
  Sue Carleo (college president)

 

Incredibly entertaining and beautiful.
  Elaine Dimal

 

Ha ha!
  Stacey McCarroll Custhaw

 

I try to make funny art…or it just comes out that way!
  Connie Craig

 


 

 
Art work from Seeing in Color Exhibit

Click on a thumbnail to see the full picture.

Meyerowitz Photo
Japanese Scene Photograph
Photo of Jupiter


Seeing in Color: Photographs from the
Stephen White Collection II


Reception & Discussion with the Collector
7 pm, Wednesday, November 4, 2009

 

Special Guest Speakers Added: noted photographers John Upton and Grant Mudford will discuss color photography


November 4 - December 17, 2009


Stephen White’s Collection numbers thousands of images covering the history of photography.  For this exhibition works have been selected that survey photographic color processes used from the middle of the 19th century to the present day, including such techniques as hand-tinting, autochrome, tricolor carbro, and dye transfer.  The subjects represented in the photographs include portraits of the famous, landscapes, and large abstractions.

 

Stephen White is a longtime collector who began as one of the first photographic art dealers in the United States when he opened his Los Angeles gallery in 1975.  He mounted two major traveling museum exhibitions from his collection, organized significant gallery exhibitions, and published numerous catalogues and a book.  In 1990 he sold his collection to a Japanese museum and soon began to collect again.  The works on exhibit are from his second collection.  Today he lives in the San Fernando Valley where he continues to collect, write and deal privately in photographic art.

 

James N. Doolittle's Aloe
James N, Doolittle
Aloe, c 1931
Tricolor Carbro Print

 


Quotes from the Guest Book

 

Stephen, great show — you have an amazing eye.
  Stephen Ehrlich, Ehrlich Architects

Fantastic Collection!
  Linde Brady, Getty Research Institute

Stephen — thank you. This was fascinating! It would be even more so if I could actually witness these different processes. We forget how much science has gone into creating the images we love.
  Heidi Wrage

Makes me feel I want to start over.
  Diana Zlotnick, collector

 

 

Reviews

LA TIMES - http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2009/11/color-photos-from-early-tokyo-to-the-beatles-and-beyond-.html

 

 

 
Viet Cong Executed Refugees Hang on for Dear Life
AP photographer Eddie Adams
"Viet Cong Executed" 1968 Pulitzer Prize Winner
 
UPI photographer Im Van
"Refugees Hang on for Dear Life" 1975

 

Mini Exhibit (hall cases)

 
In Plain View: Photographs from the Vietnam War
 
These press photos, on loan from a private collection, demonstrate the free access given to war correspondents at the time of the Vietnam War.  Included are many of the most famous, Pulitzer Prize winning images of the war that polarized opinions in the US and led to civil unrest.
 
November 4 – December 17, 2009



 
A garden with ants A mouse being held by the neck
Margarete Hahner
"After the Picnic" 2009
Oil on vinyl records
Collection of the artist
Margarete Hahner
"Wings," 2009
Oil on vinyl record
Collection of the artist


Seen But Not Heard: Paintings by Margarete Hahner
 

April 14 - May 14, 2009

 
The Art Gallery at Los Angeles Valley College is presenting Seen But Not Heard: Paintings by Margarete Hahner.  The exhibition offers recent oil paintings done primarily on 331/3rd vinyl records. The subjects of these unusual paintings range from human figures and small animals, to depictions of color systems.  These images are painted sometimes on a single record or sometimes on as many as forty records that are overlapped to form a single image.


More often Hahner's paintings are done on a series of records, one after the other, in which the image changes from one record to the next. The result is a visual metamorphosis somewhat like perceiving an optical illusion as one thing, and then suddenly seeing it as something entirely different - though in her work the transition is gradual.  Hahner says, "I often think that I'm painting one image, when another emerges.  I like the transformation, and I somehow want to capture it."


To further explore her ideas of visual transformation, Hahner has also used her painted records as the equivalents of animation cells to produce short movies of her ever-changing images.

Hahner, who is based in Los Angeles and Berlin, has had 15 one-person shows (mainly in Berlin).  Her work also has been seen in a variety of group shows in Amsterdam, Hamburg, Potsdam, Munich, Berlin and Los Angeles, including The First Annual LA Weekly Biennial at Track 16 in 2005.


Quotes from the Guest Book

 

So that's what has been going on in your garage.....
  Melissa & Ryan

Your show was rather disturbing....
  Gabrielle F.

Wow...great installation, great show...
  Meg

 

 

 
Don Bachardy
Don Bachardy
Portrait of Diana, 1982
27 ½" x 41 ½"
Acrylic on paper


Intuitive Eye: The Diana Zlotnick Collection

Reception & Discussion with the Collector
7 pm, Wednesday, February 18, 2009

 

February 18 - March 26, 2009


One summer evening in the 1970s, Diana came to my home for dinner.  She wore sunglasses when she arrived, and she kept them on after she came in the house. After an hour of looking at art, her husband, Harry - a calm anchor and gentle foil to Diana's offbeat enthusiasm - said, "Diana, take off your sunglasses."  Surprised, she removed them, looked around and remarked, "I thought your house was so dark!"  Wonderful and eccentric, Diana has been my admired friend for some 30 years.


A nonlinear thinker, Diana does not progress logically in even steps from one thing to the next.  Rather she leaps, propelled by her inventive intuition and instinct.  They have served her well.  She has built a unique and enviable collection that includes early works by important artists: Andy Warhol, George Herms, Wallace Berman, and Richard Pettibone, to name but a few.


Her engagement with art is passionate and engulfing.  Although she buys art from galleries, she prefers a more direct link to artists.  She focuses on those whose careers are just emerging.  She often visits their studios and befriends them, being among the first to buy their work.  I have heard artists comment, years later, that Diana provided badly needed money and encouragement to continue working when they most needed it.


When she brings home new art, it is not placed carefully over the couch - I don't think she even owns a couch!  The rooms in her house, even the bathrooms, are small exhibition spaces with rotating shows.  New purchases join older works, so that a newly made piece, the paint barely dry, might hang next to vintage works acquired long ago by now veteran artists such as Andy Warhol, Edward Kienholz, or Lynn Foukles.  She has been collecting since 1954, after all, when one of her first acquisitions was a John Altoon painting purchased from Walter Hopps at the now legendary Ferus Gallery. The work in this exhibition is but a small sampling of her extensive holdings.

 

Diana has loaned artworks to many museum exhibitions, and selections from her collection have been shown in the art galleries at California State University, Los Angeles (1969), Scripps College (1972), and USC (1985).  She was named a leading Los Angeles art collector by the San Francisco Museum of Art in 1976.  Since 1972, she has published Newsletter on the Arts. She is a longtime supporter of the Art Gallery at Los Angeles Valley College, and she is a member of the college's Arts Council.


I have known many collectors over the years, but none quite like Diana. It is a pleasure to be able to share with others Diana's passionate and intuitive eye.

Dennis Reed, Dean
Fine, Performing & Media Art


One in a series of exhibitions featuring collectors and their collections.


Quotes from the Guest Book

 

The show is sensational.
  Molly Barnes

...You inspired me to do my own (modest) collecting.
  Carol Clark

Congrats on a beautiful -- impressive collection.
  Lil Rodich
 

 

 

 
Doug Harvey GalleryDoug Harvey
"Great Expectorations: Bling," 2004
Mixed media
Private Collection
 

Doug Harvey Gallery wallDoug Harvey
"Joe's Temper #31," 1994
Oil on paper
Collection of the artist

 

Untidy: The Worlds Of Doug Harvey

October 15 - November 26, 2008

 

When noted contemporary art collector Diana Zlotnick was invited to select the artist for this exhibition, she chose Doug Harvey.


Harvey's imagination - an unruly, fermenting whirlpool - plays out in a surprising variety of artwork: paintings, sculptures, films, alternative radio, performances, sound art, installations, mail art, comic strip drawings and zines (cheap, self-published magazines). The diversity of his output runs contrary to the conventional notion that an artist must commit to a single artistic direction. Harvey, who is best known as the art and culture critic for the LA Weekly, has strayed from that singular path.


Attempting to characterize the breadth of his work, even when one looks only at his drawings and paintings, is challenging. For example he has drawn hundreds of small comic strip panels. He has also created large paintings on canvas done in overall patterns that cover the works from top to bottom. He has produced still other paintings, many featured in this exhibition, which consist of overlapping, artful jumbles of paint, collage and images. These are composed upon a single field of color, typically white, and seem to be arranged by caprice or by stream of consciousness. His approach to picture-making owes a debt to many, including Sigmar Polke, Kurt Schwitters, and particularly Robert Rauschenberg, as does Harvey’s use of collage and his many sources of imagery – popular culture, low and high art, technical illustration, religious iconography, and an active subconscious.


He often works in the style of underground comics, drawing characters in simple outlines with flat colors and including handwritten dialogue. He liberally peppers his work with pasted newspaper clippings, clip art, and retro mid-century magazine ads. One example demonstrates the general tenor of these sources, a 1930s ad entitled Joe’s Temper Almost Broke Up Their Home, in which a domestic conflict is played out in several comic strip panels and resolved when the characters buy softer toilet paper. Its absurd silliness, appeal to blatant consumerism, and cartoon styling were the perfect grist for Harvey’s mill. Layered fragments of this ad have found their way into numerous collages and other works by Harvey.


He is equally freewheeling in his use of painting techniques and materials, which range from kitchen shelf paper to urethane foam to traditional artist supplies. And do not look for pristine surfaces. These works are messy, with rips, stains and smudges. Harvey’s home/studio is a disheveled array of art pinned to walls, stacked carelessly in piles, or left outside to rot. His nonchalant attitude is refreshing in an art world relentlessly concerned with the preservation of unsoiled and untouchable art. When Harvey is finished with a project he moves on – done. Wait, maybe not. Most recently he has begun to paint back into works that have been weathered by the elements or inadvertently damaged, fully incorporating the deterioration into the visual fabric of his art. He has even begun to intentionally “pre-rot” materials for painting.

 

Harvey’s mixture of sources and materials results in a narrative art that is lively, slyly humorous, wryly hip, and at times crude. These works exhibit the wit of an art world insider who chooses to appear at times either erudite or common, skillful or untrained, sophisticated or naïve. Like most good art, Harvey’s work is subversive and iconoclastic.
The broad range of Harvey’s artwork, from drawings to sound pieces, pack the Art Gallery from floor to ceiling with the detritus of his untidy, unabashed creative energy.

Reviews

LA TIMES - http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2008/11/doug-harvey-the.html

 


 

 

Showcase Awards 2005
Michael Kenna © Ministère de la Culture-France

 

 

Impossible to Forget: The Nazi Camps Fifty Years After –
Photographs by Michael Kenna


April 7 through May 8, 2008

 

The exhibition consisted of 88 photographs produced by Michael Kenna, a renowned English photographer, who initially visited the Natzweiler-Struthof camp in 1986. The visit had a profound impact on him, and in 1988 he began a twelve-year project of documenting 30 Nazi concentration camps as an act of remembrance, conscientiously creating images of commemoration.

Impossible to Forget: The Nazi Camps Fifty Years After – Photographs by Michael Kenna
was organized by Patrimoine Photographique, Paris, with the support of the French Ministry of Culture, and is toured by Curatorial Assistance Traveling Exhibitions (CATE), Los Angeles.

Kenna’s work has been exhibited worldwide and is housed in many museum collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago, Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the National Gallery, Washington, D.C.

 

Quotes from the Guest Book

 

This program was an example of what Holocaust Education is truly about. Congratulations on an outstanding program.
  Rivkah Entin, Education Coordinator
Los Angeles Holocaust Museum

As the son of two concentration camp survivors, it’s hard for me to look at the beauty of the images, juxtaposed with the horror that I know my parents, grandparents, uncles and aunts went through. However, the photos and the starkness of black and white are beautifully done.
  Ted Seldberg

Fantastic photos – beautifully printed and executed. Amazingly sad content. Glad that someone preserves these horrible things to act against those who might be tempted to deny the facts
  Claire Rydell

A very powerful story in photos of a killing “industry.” How inhumane and unfeeling human beings can become. How efficiently they did away with fellow human beings. How sad that it still goes on today in different ways.
  Shirley Berg


Art Gallery Picture Impossible to Forget installation, 2008


 

 

 


Past Exhibitions (selected)

2013 Insomniacs (Student Show)
2013 Gegam Kacherian: Thirty-Six Year Survey
2012 T R A N S L A T I O N S: artists of the metro orange line
2012 S t u d e n t S h o w 2 0 1 2
2012 O b s c u r e d L i n e s : Contemporary Drawing in Los Angeles
2011 Dane Picard Selected Works
2011 A Fine Day’s Work: Photographs from the Michael R. Whalen Collection
2011 Faculty Makes: Recent Work by LAVC Faculty
2010 Cultural Windows: The Art of Ruth Asawa, Ynez Johnston and Betye Saar
2010 No Laughing Matter: Art and Humor in Southern California (a modest sampling)
2009 Seeing in Color: Photographs from the Stephen White Collection II
2009 Seen But Not Heard: Paintings by Margarete Hahner
2009 Intuitive Eye: The Diana Zlotnick Collection
2008 Untidy: The Worlds Of Doug Harvey
2008 Impossible to Forget: The Nazi Camps Fifty Years After – Photographs by Michael Kenna
2007 Sitting Pretty: Chairs of the Twentieth Century
2007 Where We Live: Student Perspectives (collaboration with the Getty Museum)
2006 Eric Johnson / Peter Lodato
2006 Dan Douke: A Sweet Ride
2006 Perceptions: Bay Area Photography, 1945-1960
2005 Private Passions – The Faculty Collects
2005 Made in LA: Posters of the Peace Press
1992 Swiss Posters
1990 Creativity in the Shadow of Political Oppression: Recent Czechoslovakian Graphic Art from the Werksman Collection
1990 June Harwood: Recent Paintings
1990 Pottery & Photography: Selections from the Fidel Danieli Collection
1989 Recent Painting, Drawing & Sculpture of Walter Askin
1988 Selections from the Ovsey Gallery: Paintings, Ceramics, Prints
1987 Handmade Poems & Books: Lena Rivkin & Edie Ellis
1986 Emerson Woelffer: Recent Collages
1986 Efram Wolff
1985 Michael Wingo: Drawings & Paintings
1984 Ornett’s Way: Judith Von Euer
1983 The Furniture of Gustav Stickley
1982 Japanese American Photography in Los Angeles, 1920 -1945
1982 Performance Art Series (Rachel Rosenthal & John White)
1981 Richard Pettibone; A Survey of Work from 1961 through 1981
1981 Photography! Summation of Life Experience: Photographs by Edmund Teske
1981 Films of James and John Whitney
1981 Paintings: Roy Dowell, June Harwood, Robin Mitchell, Herb Rabbin
1980 Guatemalan Folk Art
1970s Assemblage
1968 Art in the Mirror, from the Museum of Modern Art



Art work from student exhibit
Eric Johnson
"Hototo," 1995
Composite resin and wood
Collection of the artist
From "Eric Johnson / Peter Ladato" exhibition, 2006